10 Cheapest Electric Cars You Can Buy? Should You Really Get One?

1. Hyundai Kona $37,000

Hyundai Kona

Pros and cons

Pros

1. Affordable.
2. Has a spacious cabin.
3. Good range from its board batteries.
4. User-friendly technology.
5. Potent turbo four.
6. Quick-shifting automatic transmission.
7. Lithe handling with a well-balanced ride.

Cons

1. Transmission stumbles when driving at low speeds.
2. Numb steering.
3. Turbo Lag

Range

Kona’s electric motor delivers 150kw (240hp) for a 0-62mph time of 7.6seconds. The battery packs come in two different types to satisfy the consumers need one is the 39.2kw battery (194 miles per charge) and an experience one 64kwh battery (300 miles per charge) known as the range-extended the model.

Interior and Exterior

The cabin is largely the same as the petrol powered Kona, which means decent interior space in the rear seats for the adults The Electric vehicle battery does limit the space but it’s pretty roomy. The seats are cushy and comfortable for a family of four seats can be adjusted electrically thus a plus.
The company works on improving the brakes though. The four levels of regenerative braking are strangely inconsistent shifting up and down beneath the ball of your foot when you apply any pressure. The steering wheel is also not as efficient as it should be. But it’s understandable since it falls well under cheap electric cars.

Technology

Kona electric hasn’t stretched enough on its technology. There’s nothing mind-blowing on this department but it works fairly well. The 8-inch touch screen is responsive when needed, while physical buttons and dial are dearly marked and easy to use. In addition, Apple car play and android auto come as standard, tether to your phone, navigation, phone calls, contacts and music can be handled from the one place, by voice commands if you wish.

2. Chevrolet Bolt $36,620

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Pros and cons

Pros

1. Decent space for five
2. Spacious cargo bay
3. Smooth ride
4. User-friendly technology

Cons

1. Less aggressive in a way
2. Limited range

Exterior and interior

Although the Bolt is marketed as a crossover, in reality, it fits somewhere between a compact-crossover and a compact-hatchback. An interior passenger volume of 94.4 cubic feet and 16.9 cubic feet of cargo storage means the Bolt is more spacious than it looks. It generously has enough legroom in both the front and rear seats that technically provides a decent space for five.

Range

The bolt is fitted with a floored mounted battery powering a 200hp electric motor that ranges at 96MPGe and a 75 –mph highway range of 190 miles. A 288-cell battery pack, holding 60kWh of charge, powers the Bolt. It takes almost 10 hours to charge fully from empty when using a 240V, 32-amp Level 2 charger. But using a fast charging port will give the Bolt a range of around 90 miles, after just 30 minutes of charging. This large battery pack contributes to the Bolt’s 3,563-pound weight, which is pretty heavy for a car of its size.

Although the Bolt is heavy, it’s not slow. A top speed of 93 mph and a 0-60 mph time of 6.5 seconds come courtesy of the Bolt’s 149kW (200bhp) electric motor. More impressive, however, is the Bolts 266 lb-ft torque output, which is transferred to the road through the front wheels.

3. Kia Soul EV $34,500

kia Soul

Pros & Cons

Pros

1. Spacious room
2. Enough storage space

Cons

1. Too much road noise
2. Limited range

Interior Space and Exterior

The subcompact has 5-door crossover seats five in its 97.1 cubic feet of space. On the downside, it has three inches less legroom at the back seats than its fuel-sipping cousin. Thankfully, it was largely compensated the front. The Soul EV also has 19 cubic feet of cargo space, but this can be increased to 49.5 cubic feet with the Soul EV’s 60/40-split rear bench folded down. In addition, the EV also has storage space below its cargo floor.

Technology

The Soul EV has some improved features; rearview camera, heated car seats and wheel, navigation system, HD headlights with LED fog lights, multi-functional display, additional USB ports, keyless entry plus power button, and alloy dynamic funnel turbine wheels up to 18 inches in diameters(possibility to cause too much noise in off roads).

Range & Performance

The soul KIA EV is lagging behind compared to its rival. Coming in at just 93 miles, the Soul EV has one of the worst ranges in the industry. The limited functionality is relatively justified by its low asking price. This range comes courtesy of its 27 kWh battery, which powers its 90 kW motor. The Soul EV’s 210 lb-ft of torque means it will get to 60 mph in 9.7 seconds and max out at 92 mph.

4. Fiat 500e $32,600

Pros and cons

Pros

1. Superb fuel economy
2. Roomy seating and cargo space
3. Composed ride and handling
4. Hushed cabin

Cons

1. Less aggressive in a way
2. Limited range
3. Limited space

Range and Performance

All 147 lb-ft of torque is sent to the front wheels, taking the 500e to 60 mph in 8.4 seconds. Although this figure isn’t too exciting, the 500e does get from 0-30 mph in 2.8 seconds, so quite useful in city traffic. It will max out at 88 mph and gets a respectable 112 EPA MPGe.

The 500e will run out of range after 84 miles. This, frankly, is one of the lowest ranges in the EV industry currently and, unfortunately, there’s no DC fast charging option available. But level two charging, at 240v, will fill the 500e’s battery in less than four hours. Level one charging, at 120v, however, will only provide 9-10 miles every three hours – not great.

Exterior and interior

The wonderfully styled two-door Italian hatchback wasn’t designed with space in mind, seating four people with its passenger capacity of 78.6 cubic feet. The seven cubic feet of cargo capacity available on the 500e is down three cubic feet on the gas version, due to the battery pack.

Technology

The 500e is a good vehicle for people in cities, as its small size allows it to fit in small parking spots. Standard features include FCA’s Uconnect infotainment system with a 5-inch touchscreen, a rearview camera, and Bluetooth. Unfortunately, that’s where the standard features end. A 7-inch touchscreen is available.

5. Ford C-Max $ 32,595

2018 Ford C-MAX

Pros & Cons

Pros

1. Spacious, upscale cabin
2. Agile handling for a hybrid
3. New SYNC 3 infotainment system
4. Cheap electric car

Cons

1. Poor predicted reliability rating
2. Rivals offer more cargo space
3. Subpar fuel economy for a hybrid
4. Few available advanced safety features

Range

Unlike the Prius Plug-In, however, the C-MAX Energi offers a slightly higher range: 21 miles of fully electric driving before the gasoline engine kicks in. That leads to a total range of 600 miles or more, which is an impressive figure for any modern car.

Interior and Exterior

The front-wheel-drive C-Max Energi has zippy handling for a plug-in hybrid and a quiet, relaxed ride. However, its brakes feel uneven, which is a problem that plagues many hybrids.
The C-MAX Energi also boasts a luxury-car-like list of standard features, including everything from an 8-in touchscreen with MyFord Touch to keyless ignition and entry, dual-zone climate control and heated front seats with leather upholstery.

Technology

The easy-to-use SYNC 3 infotainment system is also standard. It has an 8-inch touch screen, a six-speaker audio system, a USB port, and satellite radio. Notable available equipment includes navigation and a Sony nine-speaker audio system

6. Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid $30,815

Toyota Prius Plug-In Hybrid

Pros and cons

Pros

1. Superb fuel economy
2. Roomy seating and cargo space
3. Composed ride and handling
4. Hushed cabin

Cons

1. White plastic trim is hard to keep clean

Range

The Prius has a four-cylinder engine and two electric motors that yield a combined 121 horsepower. A continuously variable automatic transmission and front-wheel drive are standard. The Prius returns exceptional fuel economy. The Prius Two Eco model leads the lineup with an EPA-estimated 58 mpg in the city and 53 mpg on the highway. All other Prius models are rated at 54/50 mpg city/highway.

Interior and Exterior

The redesigned Prius feels more athletic and more fun to drive than previous models and its cushioned ride shrugs off bumps nicely. Its cabin sports elegant styling and its driving position are comfortable for the long haul. Factor in the Prius’ high safety scores and low ownership costs, and you’ve got the recipe for a great family car.

Technology

The base Toyota Prius Two model is well-equipped with a standard 6.1-inch touchscreen, a rearview camera, AM/FM radio, a CD player, a USB input, Bluetooth, cloth seats, automatic climate control, keyless entry, push-button start, cruise control, alloy wheels, and a nickel-metal hydride battery pack

7. Ford Focus electric $29,995

Ford Focus electric

Pros and cons

Pros

1. Poised ride and handling
2. Roomy back seat
3. Updated infotainment system
4. Heated rear seats and heated steering wheel no longer standard

Cons</h4.
Unimpressive highway acceleration
Poor-quality interior materials

Range

The Focus Electric now has DC charging capabilities and a 115-mile range, up from its abysmal 76-mile range. This increase in range is thanks to a larger battery pack, up by 46% from 23 kWh to 33.5 kWh.
The Focus Electric’s new battery powers the 107 kW motor, which produces 184 ft-lb of torque and sends it to the front wheels. The Focus’ top speed of 84 mph is pretty standard for this category, but its 0-60 mph time of 9.9 seconds leaves a bit to be desired.

Exterior and interior

All versions of the focus have comfortable front seats but are slightly congested at the back. The dashboard is effective once you get the hang of it. It's fitted with soft-touch materials that suit the cars price tag. The Focus Electric seats 5 with ease and passengers should find enough room in its 91 cubic feet of space. The cargo capacity, however, is a bit below industry standard, at just 14 cubic feet. This is due to the on-board battery charger It's the floor of the load bay between the rear wheel wells. It, therefore, prevents a flat load floor, eats into cargo space.

Technology

Ford Focus has a ton of excellent interior technology features for you to enjoy, each offering a wealth of exceptional entertainment or infotainment possibilities! The first of these technology features is the SYNC®3 systems, which keeps you connected no matter where you want to go. This system features the ability to control calls, music, and a ton more with just your voice and a light touch, allowing you to keep your hands on the wheel.

8. Nissan Leaf $29,860

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Pros and cons

Pros

1. Poised ride and handling
2. Roomy back seat
3. Solid range with new 30-kWh battery
4. Range increases to 107 miles in SV and SL trims
5. Updated infotainment system
6. Heated rear seats and heated steering wheel no longer standard

Cons

1. Unimpressive highway acceleration
2. Poor-quality interior materials

Range

The base model can go up to 84 miles on a full charge, while higher trims can go up to 107 miles. The Leaf was a leader in driving range for electric vehicles (EVs) when it debuted in 2011, but other EVs have surpassed its range since then. The Nissan gets up to 114 mpg-e combined city/highway. Powered by a 147-horsepower electric motor, the Leaf can travel up to 151 miles on a single charge. That’s not as much range as some of its more expensive rivals, but it’s great for the price.

Exterior and interior

Space feels roomy for a compact hatchback, and road visibility is excellent. You can easily find a comfortable driving position, and tall passengers will appreciate the abundant back-seat room.

Technology

A standard feature in the new Leaf includes satellite radio, Bluetooth, and a 5-inch color display. Spending a little extra money adds Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity, navigation, and impressive ProPilot Assist. ProPilot Assist is a semi-autonomous system that can help the Leaf drive itself, even in traffic, for short periods of time.

9. Chevrolet Spark EV $27,495

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Pros and cons

Pros

1. Affordable/ cheap electric vehicle
2. Clean and simple interiors
3. Tiny footprint

Cons

1. Limited legroom
2. Cheap plastic materials
3. Excessive road noise

Range

The Spark's 1.4-liter inline 4-cylinder engine produces 98 horsepower and 94 lb-ft of torque. The standard 5-speed manual transmission delivers 29 miles per gallon in the city and 39 mpg on the highway, while the optional continuous variable automatic transmission (CVT) does slightly better, at 31 mpg city/38 mpg on the highway. The active trim drops those figures by 1 mpg.

Exterior and Interior

This 5-door hatchback is designed for visual appeal with its admittedly tiny dimensions. The second-row passenger doors are camouflaged with a handle that's integrated into the rear of the window frame, resulting in coupe-like styling.

Technology

Has a reasonable 7-hour recharge time with a 240-volt charger and a long list of standard equipment such as air conditioning, a push-button starter and a 7-inch touchscreen with Chevrolet's MYLink infotainment system.

10. Smart Electric Drive For Two $23,800

Pros and cons

Pros

1. Low asking price
2. Convenient
3. Can fit in any parking lot

Cons

1. Limited range
2. Tiny cabin room

Range

Smart is among the cheapest electric cars existing. Smart has dropped the gasoline-powered version of the Fortwo, only producing the Fortwo Electric Drive in either a coupe or convertible format. Coupe models get 124 MPGe in the city and 94 on the highway. Opting for the convertible drops those numbers to 112 in the city and 91 on the highway.
The Fortwo has a smaller electric range than most models. It is only capable of traveling 58 miles before having to be recharged. The subcompact EV needs three hours at a 240-volt charger for a full charge.

Exterior and interior

If you’re an environmentally friendly city slicker, look no further than the Smart Fortwo Electric Drive. This subcompact EV can fit in almost any parking spot, making it the ideal vehicle for people who have difficulty finding parking on city streets.

Technology

Stay in touch with your smart electric drive at all times: smart control offers numerous connected car functions. You can view the range, state of charge and a whole range of other information related to your vehicle. You can also start the pre-entry climate control process conveniently via the web app while your vehicle is charging on the grid.

how to choose ev

10 Things to Look for When Choosing an Electric Car

how to choose ev

Shopping for a new car can be stressful let alone confusing. Making up your mind on the car type fit for your needs and budget is a whole process and not as fun as it sounds. The downside of choosing the wrong car might turn out more costly in regards to maintenance costs and repairs.

There is a lot of information floating around and you can easily get overwhelmed in the process. Here are some of the electric cars guides.

Battery Life, Condition And Warranty

Most electric cars are installed with lithium-ion battery technology that is similar to smartphones, tablets, and laptops; the only difference is the battery is bigger and complex. That makes it more expensive contributing to higher price range for most models.

The disadvantages of the traditional lithium-ion batteries are it has a short lifespan and significant degradation with time. The good news is there is an alternative new lithium-ion chemistry that conserved energy and power. These improved batteries are eco-friendly, fire resistance, rapid charging, and long life spans.
Battery technology makers are making improvements in efficiency, energy, density, and weight. The EVs mostly come with a warranty for the first 100,000 miles the car covers, which is actually similar to fuel cars depending on the model.
Range

Most buyers are discouraged by the electric range of Electric cars. Truth is you have very little to worry about. On average, most drivers commute between 25-50 miles in a day, making at least 2 car trips per day.

The average range an EV can cover is 80-100 miles. This simply means you can drive the car around without “anxiety range” and get home safely without being stranded or towed home.
However, you might want to reconsider if you frequently cover long distances. Luckily there are EVs like the Tesla Model S that cover up to 330miles on a single charge. If cost isn’t your biggest worry, you might consider it

Charging

Batteries in electric cars need to recharge often. When considering a purchase do your due diligence on the car and check the available EVs charging ports. This will help you identify if the port is compatible with the local public charging stations near you.

For example, EVs like the Mitsubishi 2010 I-MiEVs have a standard sing-phase charger design that facilitates slow charging. This design is not compatible with the public charging ports because of this safety interlock feature.
The speed of charging an EV depends on the strength of the port it’s plugged into and the kind of charger in use.

The main charging options are the AC and the DC. The AC is mostly used in households and is classified into the standard 110-volt outlet and 240-volt special outlets. The charging is determined with the outlet you prefer to use. Cars plugged into the normal will socket can take up to 12 hours depending on the voltage but you have the option to install a power grid that reduces the time by half.

The DC is the fastest charging method available but it is rather expensive for household consumption. On the lighter note, only EVs like the Tesla Model S, BMW 13, Renault Zoe can charge up to 80% within 30 minutes at the quick charging stations.

Comfort

The EV offers a smooth ride that is quiet, calm and serene. The pure electric car makes the traditional car seem boring and ancient. The thought of dragging around a tank of stinking, combustible fuel and old-fashioned mechanical parts seem outdated.

The most interesting part of driving the car is that it requires nothing to gear up so when you accelerate it just moves. This offers a smoother ride and you use your brakes a lot less while driving. For the music lovers, playing the music in the car is a lot clearer than driving the conventional car. It is more serene due to the quiet engines.

Platforms like the android auto, car play or the mirror link technology make it possible for you to control your phone on the car’s dashboard. Some EVs have very advanced infotainment high- tech and are there to make your experience more memorable.

Interior and exterior

Most of the EVs are have enough room for adult passengers in the cabins. They also have reasonable storage spaces that can fit grocery bags and small luggage for your personal use.

Spare availability

The advantages of owning an electric car are they can easily be upgraded. Their firmware and software’s are designed in a way all the latest upgrades can be done. Soon the older models will have an option of improving some parts like installing onboard chargers as well as motor controller power settings.

Although this is still small upgrades, eventually, it will be possible to harbor sophisticated upgrades like complete battery changes. The combination of clever battery manager soft ware’s and battery schemes can lift off the worry out of the EV owner.

The future holds all possibility including advanced technologies making self-driving cars more accessible at an affordable price range. Although it might take a while to get the advanced systems, the manufacturers are up to the task and we have a lot to look forward too.

Price range

More affordable electric cars are being introduced and now anyone who can afford to buy a conventional car can pretty much afford an EV. This means most EV cars fall under a similar price range as the combustion engine range.

The average price for an EV is $30,000 before incentives and subsidies. The good news is the car falling below that price range is exempted from road taxes. Well, there is a wider price range to choose from in regards to your budget.

Maintenance And Efficiency

The electric motor has a less complicated engine with fewer mechanical parts than a conventional petrol/diesel. Therefore, you’ll spend less on servicing the car as opposed to the traditional engine. Charging is also cheaper than filling up fuel, whereby, a mile in an EV is four times cheaper than a mile covered by an efficient petrol vehicle.
The conventional car, on the other hand, has more parts that need constant servicing (radiators, fuel injection systems, starter motors, and exhaust systems). Maintain all the parts efficiency is costly and time-consuming.

Type (Sedan or SUV)

The term electric vehicle (EV) is commonly used to refer to three main types of automotive drivetrains. These are Battery Electric Vehicle (BEV), Hybrid-Electric Vehicle (HEV), and Plug-in Hybrid-Electric Vehicle (PHEV).

Plug-in Hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV): Plug-in hybrid-electric vehicles (PHEV) are similar to HEVs except that the proportion of energy used to propel the vehicle is electricity, not fuel. These vehicles have larger electrical drives and battery storage capacity than HEVs and are also equipped with a smaller internal combustion engine. The vehicle is designed to engage the fuel engine when battery electricity is running low or to replace the electric drivetrains when more power is required. Since PHEVs can be recharged from an electrical outlet it is possible to drive them entirely on electrical energy

Hybrid-electric vehicle (HEV): A hybrid-electric vehicle has a two-part drive system, a conventional fuel engine, and an electric drive. HEVs contain all the components of both internal combustion engine (ICE) and electric vehicles. These include an ICE engine, fuel tank, transmission as well as battery pack and electric motor. Some vehicles classified as HEV may have only a small electric motor and battery system to propel the vehicle at low speeds. Other HEVs may have smaller fuel engines and relatively larger electric drives. The degree to which the vehicle is propelled, either by fuel or electric power determines on the specific make and model of the vehicle. In all HEVs the only energy source is fuel, electrical energy is generated secondarily via alternator or regenerative braking.

Battery electric vehicle (BEV): A BEV is a pure electric vehicle in that the only source of propulsion is from electrical energy. Battery electric vehicles store electricity onboard with high-capacity battery packs. This battery power is used to run all onboard electronics as well as the main-drive electric motor(s). BEVs are powered by electricity from an external source, an electrical outlet or specialty electric vehicle charging stations.

Brand

Your top choice of electric car may be the one with the highest range, or you could be looking for the most inexpensive option. An electric vehicle can be a serious investment, and it is important to make sure that the vehicle you are purchasing has a positive review history, and is generally respected in the car industry.

Some of the brands include Tesla, BMW. Toyota, Mercedes, Nissan, Chevrolet, Ford, Volkswagen, Kia, Hyundai, Audi, Fisker, Jeep, among others.
It is important to keep in mind that a key difference between EV manufacturers can be the warranties they offer alongside their vehicles. Check out our guide to for more information on some of the differences between top electric vehicle company warranties

In general, with all the above information, you can use it to make an informed decision on how to buy electric cars and how you’ll be able to purchase the EV of your choice. Take all the basics into consideration especially the battery performance, range status and charging options in your area. That way you will be able to get a value for your money and avoid buying the wrong car.

The economic impact of electric cars

Economical Benefits of Electrical Cars

The economic impact of electric cars

Cheaper to run

Depending on the distance you cover, the cost of gas, electricity for charging, maintenance, government and utility incentives, and value for your time, you’ll be saving more money with an electric car than with gasoline car.

Electric motors can provide high power to weight ratios, batteries can be designed to supply the currents needed to support these motors. Electric motors have flat torque curve down to zero speed. For simplicity and reliability, many electric cars use fixed-ratio gearboxes and have no clutch.

Many electric cars have motors that have high acceleration, relative to comparable cars; however, most EV may have a low acceleration due to their relatively weak motors. This is largely due to the relatively constant torque of an electric motor, which often increases the acceleration relative to a similar ICE motor power

Electric vehicles can also use a direct motor-to-wheel configuration which increases the available power. Having motors connected directly to each wheel allows the wheels to be used both for propulsion and as braking systems, thereby increasing traction When not fitted with an axle, transmission, differential, electric vehicles have less drive-train inertia.
EV covers a larger range with minimum running costs. The electricity to charge an electric car works out around a third as much per kilometer as buying petrol for the same vehicle. It’s actually very cheaper to buy a second-hand electric car.

Cheaper to maintain

The electric motor has a less complicated engine with fewer subsystems (tires, suspension and brakes) than a conventional petrol/diesel. There are relatively little servicing and no expensive exhaust systems, starter motors, fuel injection systems, radiators and many other parts that aren’t needed in an EV.
Oil changes, a transmission that can break, mufflers, various hoses and belts, and other complicated parts are another thing of the past with the EV. Electric cars are much simpler by default, so they can save you a lot of time and headaches.
Therefore, you’ll spend less on servicing the car as opposed to the traditional engine. Charging is also cheaper than filling up fuel, whereby, a mile in an EV is four times cheaper than a mile covered by an efficient petrol vehicle.

Health benefits

Battery electric vehicles don’t produce any tailpipe emissions compared to the average gasoline car produces over 350 grams of CO2 per mile. Cleaner air means less disease in the world, which means less stress on public health systems, hospitals, and so on. In addition, fewer greenhouse gas emissions will save the ozone layer and reduce our carbon footprint. If we can’t stop global warming, we can certainly slow down the onset, and EVs are nothing if not a good start.

Safety improvements

All passenger vehicles are required to pass the same safety and crash tests. However, electric cars have a few extra features which may make them safer to ride. For instance, advanced battery management systems to monitor the activity of each cell and pass information to a CPU, which can adjust the cooling system, warn the driver, and even shut down the battery completely as soon as a problem is detected.

Engineers also armor the battery packs of their vehicles to prevent damage during collisions and punctures to avoid an accident like the 2013 Tesla fire in Washington. Tesla now says its redesigned titanium underbody shield cuts the chances of a battery fire caused by damage to almost non-existent. EV battery cells are segmented by firewalls, which contain or at least slow the spread of a fire, buying time for the driver to pull over and exit the vehicle.

Heavy battery packs significantly lower an EV’s center of mass; the car is less likely to roll over. The weight of the batteries makes the electric car heavier than a comparable gasoline vehicle. In case of a collision, the passengers in the EV will suffer less serious injuries than the occupants of the other lighter cars.

Despite having the negative car performance, the lower the center of gravity, the car is more stable and lowers the risk of an accident due to loss of control. Manufacturers of electric vehicles don’t spare any expense on built-in safety systems, which is why EVs regularly exceed all safety standards. In fact, many EVs score higher in crash test safety ratings.

Better for the environment

It has been a major concern to everyone about the climate changes and the effects it has on our environment. Electric cars are purposely built in favor of the environment. The EVs have several benefits over conventional combustion engine automobiles, including a significant reduction of local air pollution as they do not produce pollutants such as CO2, oxides of nitrogen, soot, volatile organic compounds, hydrocarbons, ozone, and lead.
The introduction of the electric cars is part of the process of improving the climate as they do not emit any harmful gases that pollute the air. Luckily, the cost and health related issues caused by air pollution will decrease.
Some of the EVs engineers are taking recycling to the next level by using Eco-friendly materials to build the cars. For instance, the makers of Ford Focus Electric car are using recycled materials and padding the car with bio-materials.
Nissan Leaf is also adopting the recycling idea and it is impressive. The interior and exterior are partly made of recycled bottles, second-hand appliances, old car parts and plastic bags. They are all about recycling materials and environmental conservation.

Renewable energy

The Engineers are also adopting renewable energy systems and it’s a great idea. You are able to charge your EV using the solar panel system on the go instead of waiting until you reach the grid. Solar cars are electric vehicles powered completely or significantly direct solar energy, through photovoltaic (PV) cells contained in solar panels that convert the sun’s energy directly into electric energy, usually used to charge a battery. This method is more economical and saves time as you get to charge it during the day where most activities take place.
Using renewable energy to recharge your EV, you help reduce your greenhouse gas emissions further. For the electric grid, the emissions vary significantly depending on your region, the availability of renewable sources and the efficiency of the fossil fuel-based generation used. The sourcing of the fuel tanks causes further damage and use of resources during the extraction and refinement processes, including high amounts of electricity.

Hyundai Ioniq Electric Pricing features and our Reviews – All Years

Hyundai aims at building 22 ‘green’ cars on sale by 2020. The car models include 12 hybrids, 6 plug-in hybrids, 2 fuel cell cars and 2 pure electric cars. The manufacturers aim to build a simple Ioniq that is simpler than its main competitors Toyota Prius, Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf.

Hyundai is trying to invoke a degree of pleasure while driving and make the car as refined as possible. From the front, the car is relatively good looking and we commend Hyundai for not trying to make the car look too outlandish like some hybrids or electric cars can do. Apart from the blue strips that adorn the car's bumpers, you’d assume it was just another ICE vehicle.

Ioniq Hybrid feels so acutely aware of its position in the market, to deliver no frills or dramas but just simple, reliable and comfortable driving. It boasts a really handsome set of equipment, solid fuel economy and low running costs making it a fairly straightforward proposition.

Inside the car, the design is also pretty solid and has a lot of nice soft-touch materials on the dash and around the interior, but there is nothing too outlandish here. Visibility can be a problem at times due to the unusual rear window design which is split in half by a bulky bar that reducing rear visibility. What’s more is that there is no rear windscreen wiper which means that if the rear window gets dirty or is battered by rain then visibility can be drastically reduced.

The Ioniq hybrid’s set-up consists of a 77kW/147Nm 1.6-liter direct injection engine running on the lean burning Atkinson cycle, with a 32kW/170Nm electric motor placed between it and the six-speed twin-clutch auto.

The motor draws juice from a 1.56kW/h lithium-ion polymer battery (which has a 10-year warranty) living under the back seat. Hyundai rates the total system output at 104kW and 265Nm and says the official fuel test result is 3.9L/100km. It’s rated to comply with Euro6 emissions standards too.

The battery is recharged on the move by the engine or when coasting or braking; you don’t plug this version in at all, just fill it with gas every few weeks. There’s little in the way of wind noise thanks to its slippery form, but it generates more noise than the EV; the engine is a source and so to the rubber as it’s fitted with actual tires, sporty Michelins in this case rather than skinny eco treads. So there’s more grip and it turns more keenly but the steering is numb, as is the chassis feel.

Flick the gear lever into Sports mode and the dials glow red as blood, the engine works harder, revving longer while the cogs are swapped more hastily as well. But it doesn’t feel quite right to attack the bends in this sort of hybrid. No, it’s more a means of convenient, economical conveyance.

So economical then, the engine requiring petrol needs to be outmoded. But if you’re still a little anxious about touring range and aren’t quite ready to part with $60k - $66k for a hatch, then the hybrid might suit better. Not that this is a whole lot cheaper, starting at $47k while the Elite tested is $53k, but it’s line-ball with the main competition, the Toyota Prius ($47,490 - $54,990)

Most national and local governments around the world provide financial incentives for consumers to purchase electric vehicles. Every new EV purchased for use in the U.S. is entitled to the internal revenue internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax credit for $2,500 to $7,500. Specific tax credit amounts for individual vehicles are available at Tax Credits for Electric and Tax Credit for plug-in hybrids pages.

The Hyundai Ioniq will not set your heart singing nor will it give you a thrill every time you put your foot down but that is really not the point of it. Essentially, if you want a car to be a car and be a workhorse like a diesel but not leave you with the anxiety over its future then it’s hard to look past the Ioniq.

2019 Hyundai Ioniq Electric vehicle review

2019 Hyundai Ioniq Electric vehicle review

Pros and cons

Pros

  • The Hyundai Ioniq electric car is built with eco-friendly materials.
  • Its efficiency on both sides is the upside of their Plug-in and it can’t be refuted.
  • User-friendly infotainment system and intuitive controls
  • Reasonably spacious interiors.
  • Hassle free experience, steady handling and smooth ride
  • Excellent fuel economy and MPGe ratings
  • Large cargo area
  • Built with eco-friendly materials

Cons

  • Its range is not as good as its competitors.
  • Still has the same design which is now a bore.
  • Minimal regenerative brakes.
  • Not enough space as its rivals.
  • Limited acceleration.

Price Range

With three models and at least two trims to choose from for each, the 2019 Ioniq doesn’t leave us wanting for options. Hybrid models are available in Blue, SEL, and Limited, while the other two come in base and limited flavors.

The Ioniq Hybrid Blue starts at just over $22,000 and includes a keyless ignition and a 7.0-inch touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility, dual climate control, and 15-inch alloy wheels.

SEL models begin at $24,000 and add heated front seats and door mirrors, LED daytime running lights and taillights, power-adjustable driver’s seat, 7.0-inch display in the instrument cluster, and standard active safety features that we cover above.

The $27,550 range-topping Limited trim brings leather, interior LED lights, power sunroof, 17-inch alloys, more trim accents, and Hyundai’s telematics system.

Base versions of the Plug-In and Electric Ioniq cost $24,950 and $29,500 respectively and have features roughly comparable to the Hybrid SEL model—other than the obvious differences in their powertrains.

All Ioniqs come with Hyundai’s 5-year/60,000-mile limited vehicle warranty and 10-year/100,000-mile powertrain warranty.

Exterior and Interior

The Hyundai Ioniq electric car is built with eco-friendly materials. The engineers put in a great effort into every detail of their work. The company is using natural and renewable materials, bio-fabrics, recycled plastics and other eco-friendly materials in the production of the “green” cars. The end result is a product that looks good, lasts long and supports the earth.

The color choices for Ioniq models include Black Noir Pearl, Symphony Air Silver, Intense Blue, Ceramic White, Summit Gray and Scarlet Red exterior color for the Hybrid model.

In creating the exterior appearance of Ioniq, Hyundai designers concentrated on its futuristic design, fundamental to its appeal. A fluid exterior shape and natural air flow channels emphasize aerodynamic body lines and surface volumes.

A sporty Ioniq with the hatchback-like profile is inspired by aerodynamic efficiency, complementing the soft lines and surfaces that trace the car’s outline. These attributes combine to boost aerodynamics further, which, when combined with various other smart efficiency solutions, produce an industry-leading 0.24 coefficient of drag.

The 2019 Ioniq retains the sedan shape with a hybrid added touch. The hatchback has four doors with the same exterior lines that sweep neatly upwards from the front to the back. Although the Ioniq shares some features with the Elantra sedan, the overall design of the Ioniq is unmistakably different.

The hatchback design enables the car to have a spacious cargo area and helps reduce wind resistance and drag. Surprisingly, only one Ioniq gets to have a grille and open fascia, the other hybrids and electric vehicles lack in this area. Flanked by neatly integrated headlight units that feature either projector or HD lights, the front end of the Ioniq is stylish and tasteful.

The Hyundai Ioniq EV settled on simple, normal and familiar interiors, unlike their competitors. The shift and parking-brake levers have been replaced with a set of buttons and controls for the interactive display.

Enjoy the luxurious comfort of an available power driver seat with lumbar support, available heated front seats and available leather seating surfaces. Just press your driver settings button, and the driver seat and mirrors adjust to your preferred positions.

Range

Hybrid Ioniqs get a 1.6-liter engine that produces 104 horsepower and 109 pound-feet of torque. The engine is supplemented with a 32kw (43 hp) electric motor that makes use of regenerative braking and a 1.56kwh battery. Braking force is optimized for maximum efficiency from the regenerative braking system, helping Ioniq to maintain a steady state of charge (SOC).

The Ioniq plug-in hybrid model also uses a 1.6-liter inline-4 with 104 hp and 109 lb-ft of torque. This engine is designed to maximize fuel energy use and has been tuned to be paired with a hybrid system, which is handled by a 45kw (60 hp) electric motor. The powertrain is completed by a 6-speed automatic. On pure electric power, the plug-in hybrid can travel 29 miles.

Electric models are powered by an 88kw (118 hp) motor that gets its juice from a 28kwh lithium-polymer battery. This package is good for a range of up to 124 miles and an energy consumption rating of 136 MPGe, which should be good enough to help the Ioniq keep its crown as the most energy efficient vehicle on the market for another year.

Hyundai’s focus on making a hybrid that is also fun to drive shines through in the Ioniq. The two hybrid models receive a multi-link rear suspension, while the electric model’s larger battery pack limits it to a torsion-beam rear axle. The system is set up to work with a range of 15, 16, and 17-inch wheels and low-rolling-resistance tires. The Ioniq is gifted with a lower center of gravity, thanks to its battery placement.

Utility

The new Ioniq EV car comes with a battery warranty that lasts a lifetime. Ioniq Plug-in's Hybrid's lithium-ion polymer battery is already powerful. Add the extra boost of confidence you’ll get from Hyundai’s exclusive Lifetime Hybrid/Electric Battery Warranty, and it’s pretty much unstoppable.

Hyundai Ioniq 2019 has been a smart design that has a modified powerful battery that its size has been reviewed. This means there is much-needed space for family, pets, hobby gears, shopping and friends. In addition, the rear seat is flexible for 60/40 split folding seat to create more space.

Technology

Hyundai Ioniq is installed with smart cruise control advanced features installed to alert you of any situation that can compromise your safety and of others around you. For example, it alerts you when there is a pedestrian or vehicle slowing down to avoid a potential collision. It also has available blind spot detection with rear cross-traffic alert. Lane keeps assist system is installed to alert you when you drift outside your lane without signaling, plus it assists you to steer safely back into your lane.

The Ioniq advanced the apple car play and android auto support systems. The mobile apps are here to make life simpler and the Ioniq is taking advantage of them. You can now control your phone safe from the car's touchscreen on the dashboard with your choice of Apple carplay or android auto support.

Alternatively, you can use voice activation system to access the control systems like the starting the engine, access remote lock (the Proximity Key in your pocket or purse makes it easy to unlock or lock your car or start the engine with the simple push of a button) and cars maintenance scheduling. It’s also fitted with wireless device charging that you simply place your QI standard compatible phone on the charging pad, and arrive charged up and ready to go.

With this new technology, audio that gets lost through digital compression is fully restored, making your music sound better than ever. The sound is absorbed, and noise and distraction are muted. The Ioniq’s interior was made to provide peace and quiet and the car has delivered exactly that, no doubt. Plus, our wind tunnel-tested design is optimized to manage airflow and improve aerodynamics.

Full specifications

EPA mileage

All electric range: 29miles

Fuel tank capacity: 11.4

Combined driving range: 630miles

Engine Horsepower: [email protected]

Torque:  [email protected]

Electric motor battery

     Power output: 44.5kw (60hp)

     Torque: 125lb- ft

      Voltage:   360v

      Battery capacity: 8.9kwh

      Range: 75mph

Exterior:   4 doors

Warranty:   Lifetime

2018 Hyundai Ioniq Electric vehicle review

2018 Hyundai Ioniq Electric vehicle review

Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Hassle-free experience
  • Excellent fuel economy and MPGe-ratings
  • Three model types: hybrid, electric, plug-in hybrid
  • Cheaper to maintain
  • Familiar design
  • Solid safety and predicted reliability scores
  • Excellent intuitive control
  • Improved user-friendly infotainment system
  • One of the most affordable electric vehicles
  • Generous cargo space in back
  • Packed with active driving aids and technology
  • A most efficient electric vehicle on the market

Cons

  • Not enough space as its competitors
  • The battery occupies too much space
  • The plug-in range is twice the voltage
  • Disconnected handling and ride quality
  • Limited rear seating area
  • Rear visibility is slightly impeded by the low-cut, split rear window
  • Acceleration lacks punch

Range

The 2018 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid is powered by a 1.6-liter I-4 paired to a 32kW electric motor for a total system output of 139 hp and delivers an impressive EPA-rated 57/59 mpg city/highway for the base Blue model and 55/54 mpg for the rest of the lineup (2017 figures).

The Ioniq Plug-In uses the same 1.6-liter engine but paired to a larger 45kW electric motor with an estimated total output of 156 hp. The EPA has yet to rate the plug-in model. The hybrid and plug-in models send power to the front wheels through a six-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission.

A 118-hp, 215-lb-ft of torque 88kW electric motor powers the Ioniq Electric and comes with an EPA-rated driving range of 124 miles. The Ioniq Hybrid hit 60 mph in 9.4 seconds and stopped from 60 mph in 124 feet, expected numbers from a hybrid vehicle.

The Ioniq hybrid isn’t fast, it takes 8.9 seconds to accelerate from zero to 60 mph. Shift timing isn’t perfect in Eco mode; the transmission pauses too long to downshift when acceleration is demanded. The fault is particularly noticeable on inclines, where the Ioniq often loses speed before downshifting.

The Ioniq in Sports mode works a little better, where it can be manually shifted and feels snappier. When starting off on hills, if you’re not quick with the throttle the Ioniq will roll backward as the transmission ponders when to engage and provide forward motion, hopefully, they will improve on that
The front-wheel-drive Ioniq has mediocre handling, with decently weighted steering but little feedback from the road. The car can also jolt around a bit on the highway or on bumpy pavement. The regenerative brakes work smoothly.

These brakes perform well in everyday situations. Not too much initial grab. Not too soft. There are three levels of brake regeneration that can be adjusted on-the-fly via paddles mounted on the back of the steering wheel. Panic stops from 60 mph took 124 feet, a tick below the class average.

Hyundai claims that the Ioniq Plug-In can run on all-electric power for up to 27 miles and has a total driving range of more than 650 miles.

Exterior

The Ioniq hybrid has a close resemblance to those of the Chevrolet Volt and Toyota Prius. If you are keen enough you would notice the sloping nose and squared-off rear end were necessary for the Hyundai to achieve the Ioniq’s excellent aerodynamics: the less aerodynamic drag on a car, the better its fuel economy.

The Hyundai trapezoidal grille is flanked by swept-back headlights. The Electric model has a blanking plate, rather than a grille, and it along with the Plug-In versions have LED headlights. The windshield is raked back, but a horizontal accent line divides relatively flat body sides, leading into conventional taillights.

Hyundai claims it's 0.24 drag coefficient is among the lowest for production cars, and it goes to show that being energy-efficient doesn’t mean overly odd or instantly noticeable shapes
The range-topping Hyundai Ioniq Limited comes with 17-inch alloy wheels, power moonroof, heated front leather seats, HID headlights with LED accents, LED interior illumination, LED taillights, power-folding side mirrors with puddle lamps, rear seat air vent.

Interior

The way the interior space is laid out, however, indicates the compromises Hyundai made to achieve those goals. It’s smaller than the latest Toyota Prius and lower and less upright than competitors like the Chevy Bolt EV or Nissan Leaf.

The interior could be that of any small Hyundai, with a few individual touches on top of the standard black, matte silver, and optional two-tone shapes and materials. Inside, Hyundai has replaced the conventional shift and parking-brake levers on the tunnel with a set of buttons and the controller for the interactive display in the center of the dashboard.
Quality is sterling in the Ioniq. A combination of a clean layout, high-grade materials, and comfortable seats gives these compact cars a premium feel. The latest Hyundai interiors are quietly stylish but tastefully restrained for mass-market vehicles. Any Elantra or Sonata owner should find the Ioniq’s cabin instantly familiar.

Sustainable or recycled materials for interior elements include door covers made of a plastic that includes powdered wood and volcanic stone. They differ in feel from standard plastics, and overall, the pricier end of the Ioniq range has somewhat more hard plastic than you might expect, especially inside the Electric mode.

Front-seat headroom is ample, even when the sunroof is present. Legroom is decent, though depending on seating position, there may not be enough to stretch on longer drives. But it's truly a snug fit for 6-footers in the backseat: headroom, toe room and knee room are in short supply for tall people.

The Ioniq lineup comes standard with seven airbags and offers most of the latest active-safety systems. On introduction, those included adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitors with rear cross-traffic alert and forward-collision warnings with automatic emergency braking and pedestrian detection. For 2018, Hyundai has upgraded the lane-departure warning to active lane control on all versions of the Ioniq.

Eco-conscious shoppers will also appreciate that many of the interior materials are eco-friendly. Sustainable or recycled materials for interior elements include door covers made of a plastic that includes powdered wood and volcanic stone. They differ in feel from standard plastics, and overall, the pricier end of the Ioniq range has somewhat more hard plastic than you might expect, especially inside the Electric mode.

Price Range

The base plug-in model adds about $2,800 to your price tag, but its available $4,543 federal tax credit more than offsets that increase, making this the smartest buy of the bunch. Available trim levels for the Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid are base ($24,950) and Limited ($28,300).

The Ioniq Electric – a battery electric vehicle with a single-speed transmission – comes in the base ($29,500) and Limited ($36,000) trims levels. If you're able to take full advantage of the $7,500 federal tax credit, you'll spend less on an Ioniq Electric than on an Ioniq Hybrid. Note that this model is currently only available to residents of California.

Utility

By design, hatchbacks offer more utility than sedans. The Ioniq's advantage in this area over competitive compact sedans is when it comes to other hatchbacks, the Hyundai blends in. None of its small- or large-item storage features raise it above the norm.

Hyundai lists the cargo volume at 23.8 cubic feet. It is large enough for five carry-on-size suitcases behind the second row without impeding the driver's view over the seatbacks. The rear seats also split 60/40 and fold down nearly flat.

Technology

It doesn't take long to become a pro at using Hyundai's infotainment system. The interface is easy to navigate, with a nice array of redundant buttons and knobs for when you don't want to use the touchscreen. As a bonus, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are included, with embellishments like wireless charging for your phone and an eight-speaker Infinity stereo among the options.

The range-topping Hyundai Ioniq Limited comes with 17-inch alloy wheels, power moonroof, heated front leather seats, a power-adjustable driver seat, driver-seat memory settings, an auto-dimming rearview mirror, a sunroof, interior ambient lighting, and rear air vents, HID headlights with LED accents, LED interior illumination, LED taillights, a 7.0-inch center touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, a 7.0-inch driver’s display screen, leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, and Blue Link Telematics, Connected Care, and Remote Charge Access.

The Ioniq Electric Limited comes standard with heated leather front seats, a powered driver’s seat, LED headlights, 16-inch eco-spoke wheels, 7.0-inch center touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, a 7.0-inch driver’s display screen, power-folding side mirrors with puddle lamps, rear seat air vents, leather-wrapped steering wheel, and Blue Link Telematics, Connected, Remote Package, and Remote Charge Access.

The Limited also comes standard with active safety features and driver aids, including automatic emergency braking, blind-spot monitoring with rear cross-traffic alert, adaptive cruise control with stop-start, and lane departure warning with lane-keeping assistant.

Full specifications

Engine
Horsepower: 118hp
Keyless ignition: doors and push button
Torque: 218lb –ft
Fuel consumption
City: 150mpg
Highway: 122mpg
Seat capacity: 5 passengers
Warranty: 60 months

2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric Vehicle Review

2017 Hyundai Ioniq Electric vehicle review

Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Handsome interior, comfortable and materials are made from eco-friendly materials.
  • Excellent value for money and bargain lease deal
  • Nice range options available for top trim levels
  • Class-leading fuel economy
  • Agile handling and comfortable ride
  • Easy to use infotainment systems
  • Large cargo bay

Cons

  • Minimal regenerative braking and poor performance
  • Base trim offers best in MPG but no options
  • Allows too much outside noise to penetrate
  • Limited accelerations due to less power reducing highway speeds
  • Front seats have a short seat cushion

Price Range

The Ioniq Hybrid comes in four trim levels, starting with the Blue at $24,299. There’s an SE at $26,499 and Limited at $29,749, while my tester, the Limited Technology, tops out at $31,749. That’s a lower base price than the Niro at $24,992, and the Prius, which starts at $27,190. If you're able to take full advantage of the $7,500 federal tax credit, you'll spend less on an Ioniq Electric than on an Ioniq Hybrid. The Ioniq also undercuts the base prices of other larger gas-electric hybrids, such as the Ford Fusion, Honda Accord and Sonata Hyundai’s very own.

Exterior and Interior

The Ioniq PHEV is attractive by the familiar looks and feels it poses with a straightforward interior and the normal Hyundai interface with sensible ergonomics.

The Hybrid cabin styling can go either oddball or conventional, and Hyundai opts for the latter with a clean and simple look that’s similar to most of its other vehicles. There’s space to stash small items, while frequently-used features on the climate and infotainment are handled by hard buttons – as they should be on all vehicles to minimize distraction.

The transmission has actual gear ratios to work through instead of the slurry drone of a continuously variable automatic, and the engine cuts in and out of the power cycle mostly unobtrusively.

The Ioniq's placement of controls is clear and logical with lots of large buttons. The infotainment screen is high-resolution and doesn't wash out, and the menu flow is simple (no navigation). The redundant hard keys are a nice touch, too.

Although the brake pedals a bit soft in initial feel, transitions well from regenerative to friction retardation. It's easy to find a suitable driving position thanks to a good range of adjustment in both the seat and the tilt-and-telescoping steering column. As a bonus, the steering wheel also offers terrific grip shapes.

The front windshield pillar bases and rearmost pillars are pretty chunky and can be obstructing. But there's a decent rear view, thanks to split glass in the hatch. (The bisecting beam is an unfortunate byproduct). The backup camera view is smallish and not especially sharp, but it's certainly adequate.

There are ample legroom and headroom for tall drivers, thanks in part to the lack of a sunroof. Inside the car feels airy and the pedal box for the driver's feet is sufficiently wide.

The capacious hatchback cargo area is good for 23 cubic feet of space with the rear sets up, yet those taller in stature may find that the Ioniq’s sloping roofline that flows into the blunt can intrude upon rear-seat headroom. Six-footers in the backseat are somewhat cramped with limited headroom and toe room. Decent knee room, though.

The front doors are usefully long and open wide, and the wide but low sills and minimal seat bolster help access. Access to the rear seat is smaller; the narrowness, combined with the gently sloping roofline and high seat, hampers entry to a degree.

Range

The 2017 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid has a four-cylinder engine and an electric motor that produce a combined 139 horsepower. The Ioniq uses a refined six-speed dual-clutch transmission. The Ioniq Electric has a 118-horsepower electric motor mated to a single-speed reduction-gear transmission.

Powering the all-new 2017 Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid is a 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine that produces 104 horsepower and an electric motor that generates 43 horsepower. The Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid has the same powertrain. A six-speed dual-clutch transmission is standard in both. The Ioniq Electric has a 118-horsepower electric motor mated to a single-speed reduction-gear transmission. Unusually, the Ioniq uses a six-speed dual-clutch transmission, an automatic unit that sets up the next year as soon as it engages the current one for quick and efficient shifts. Most mainstream hybrids use a continuously variable transmission (CVT) instead.

With the Ioniq Electric, expect 150 MPGe in the city and 122 MPGe on the highway. The electric version allows you to drive 124 miles on a single charge. The battery can be recharged in just 23 minutes at a fast-charging station. At home, it takes about 4.5 hours with a 220-volt wall socket plug.

The Ioniq Electric is motivated by a single 118-hp permanent-magnet synchronous AC motor. Although its power output is modest, the motor provides an instantaneous 215 lb-ft of torque. While a zero-to-60-mph time of 8.6 seconds and a quarter-mile run of 16.7 seconds at 83 mph are nothing to brag about, both are slight improvements over the numbers put down by the 139-hp Ioniq hybrid, which needed 8.9 seconds and 16.9 seconds (at 82 mph) to complete both feats.

The Hyundai Ioniq's acceleration feels stronger than that of competing hybrids. The powertrain is also smooth and quiet. However, at low speeds, acceleration can take a few seconds to kick in. The Ioniq Electric isn’t as quick off the line as all-electric rivals like the Chevrolet Bolt.

Around tight turns, the Hyundai Ioniq feels nimble, and its driving dynamics are better than those of its competitor like the Toyota Prius. Its ride is also smooth, thanks to its soft rear suspension. Steering, on the other hand, could use better feedback.

The Ioniq Hybrid has a Sports mode that makes the drive even more enjoyable. The Ioniq Electric's suspension differs from that on the hybrid and plug-in hybrid models, and it doesn't have a Sports mode. Nevertheless, the Ioniq Electric is a comfortable driver.

Utility

Its cargo hold is relatively basic but sizable enough to swallow most everyday items you'd want to transport. The cabin nooks upfront number appropriately, though backseat occupants don't have nearly as many options.

A tall, narrow console bin and open, narrow slot are surprisingly useful; so is the well forward of the shift selector. The door pockets are useful for water bottles only, and the glove box is basic. The backseat has only two tiny door pockets and a net on the back of the passenger front seat.

The backseat is split 60/40 and folds nearly flat. The hatch opens high so tall people won't hit their heads on it, but the liftover height is on the tall side. The cargo holds measures 26.5 cubic feet (vs. the Prius' 24.6 cubes) and is wide, if not that tall, at the aft-most point.

The outboard seat LATCH anchors are buried deep between the cushions and are somewhat hard to reach. The top tether points are obscured by a retractable cargo shade.

Technology

The entry-level Ioniq Electric includes a proximity key with push-button start, automatic climate control, heated front seats, and a 7.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system with simple phone pairing and supports Apple CarPlay and Android Auto capability. The Ioniq screen may be small, but it's well-lit and responds well to touch inputs. The small infotainment screen supports swiping gestures and responds reasonably quick, making the most of its size.

The native voice controls function well but are limited in what they can control. Voice recognition (VR) supports only basic commands like phone calls, switching audio source natively, but it responds well. In any case, that's where Apple CarPlay and Android Auto come in. You can access your Smartphone’s VR by holding the Ioniq's VR button for a few seconds.

The audio system has a brassy sound quality, with minimal bass. There's no native navigation system, but you can navigate using Apple CarPlay or Android Auto. Bluetooth pairing is simple and fast, and Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility are standard. There are USB and auxiliary ports and two 12-volt accessory outlets, which is okay.

The Limited trim level adds features such as blind-spot monitoring, leather upholstery, a power driver’s seat, LED headlights, adaptive cruise, blind-spot monitoring with lane change assist, automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, lane departure warning, a rearview camera with rear cross-traffic alert and rear HVAC vents.

Ultimate package includes a power sunroof, an 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system with navigation, adaptive cruise control, and advanced-safety items such as automated emergency braking and lane-departure warning. That’s an improvement.

Full specifications

Price range:
Electric: $29,500
Limited: $32,500

Engine:
Horsepower: 118hp
Keyless ignition: doors and push button
Torque: 218lb –ft

Fuel consumption:
City: 150mpg
Highway: 122mpg

Seat capacity: 5 passengers
Warranty: 60 months

Advantages and disadvantages of electric cars

Advantages and disadvantages of electric cars

People are receptive of the electric cars more than ever. Surprisingly, the EV concept date way back to the ’60s and it’s until now that it is gaining popularity. The automotive industry has come a long way.

Some companies have dived into the electric world and produced pure electric cars, while others are still testing the waters and offer hybrid vehicles that use both fuel and electricity. Truth is electric cars are a great step forward and a positive way to help contribute towards a healthy and stable environment.

Some of the electric model types are the Tesla Model S, Mitsubishi-iMiEV, Prius EV, Nissan Leaf, Fisker Karma, CODA, Smart 4-2EV, Chevrolet Volt. You definitely are spoiled for choice with so many brands to choose from. All you need is to get your facts right and way your options. Here are the pros and cons to help you make better decisions:

10 Advantages of Electric Cars

1. No gas is required

The main reason for EV invention is to reduce the cost of fuel. The average cost for fuel spent by conventional car owners is $2000-$4000 each year. This means most Americans use up a chunk of their savings on gas alone. Charging is cheaper than filling up with petrol/diesel. Though electricity isn’t free, an EV is cheaper to own. A plug-in hybrid eliminates a major portion of your gas bill, as well, but it still uses a gasoline engine as a range extender.

2. Charging at home

The idea of charging at home and avoiding trips to the gas station is. It’s a convenient way to charge your car just like your smartphone and in the morning it’s ready to go. On average, most drivers commute between 25-50 miles per day which is more than enough. Unless you’re planning to go more than 80-100 miles of the average range, you’ll be good to go on your daily activities.

3. Popularity

EV’s are growing in popularity. With popularity comes new models and competition between the automakers. This means you as the buyer are spoilt for choice and have a larger pool to compare in the market, providing you with a wealth of choices moving forward.

4. Safe to drive

Electric cars undergo the same fitness and testing procedures test as other fuel powered cars. Different control units and wiring are installed to improve the user's experience by achieving more accurate and transparent systems that control your driving environment. The car is made smart enough to detect any faults and possibly prevent accidents. In case an accident occurs, one can expect airbags to open up and electricity supply to cut from the battery. This can prevent you and other passengers in the car from serious injuries.

5. Eco-friendly

Electric cars have a smaller impact on the environment than conventional cars. The EVs are 100% eco-friendly as they run battery powered engines (BEV). This means they do not emit exhaust that pollutes the air as they run on the only clean energy source. The good news is better air quality leads to fewer health problems and clean environment to live in.

6. Maintenance And Efficiency

The electric motor has a less complicated engine with fewer mechanical parts than a conventional petrol/diesel. The internal combustion engine (ICE), require plenty of fluids to keep it moving and functioning properly. The EV has fewer subsystems; therefore, you’ll spend less on servicing the car as opposed to the traditional engine.

7. Comfort And Space

The good news is the EV offers a smooth ride that is quiet, calm and serene. The pure electric car makes the traditional car seem boring and ancient. The thought of dragging around a tank of stinking, combustible fuel and old-fashioned mechanical parts seem outdated.

The most interesting part of driving the car is it requires nothing to gear up so when you accelerate it just moves. This offers a smoother ride and you use your brakes a lot less while driving. For the music lovers, playing the music in the car is a lot clearer than driving the conventional car. It is more serene due to the quiet engines.

Platforms like the android auto, car play or the mirror link technology make it possible for you to control your phone on the car’s dashboard. Some EVs have very advanced infotainment high- tech and are there to make your experience more memorable.

8. Software/ Hardware/ Firmware Upgrades

The advantages of owning an electric car are they can easily be upgraded. Their firmware and software’s are designed in a way all the latest upgrades can be done. Soon the older models will have an option of improving some parts like installing onboard chargers as well as motor controller power settings.

Although this is still small upgrades, eventually, it will be possible to harbor sophisticated upgrades like complete battery changes. The combination of clever battery manager soft ware’s and battery schemes can lift off the worry out of the EV owner.

9. Pricing

Electric cars are affordable to buy and cheaper to maintain. For instance, most EV fall in the $30,000 price range before subsidies. It may cost a less the amount after federal income tax credits (costs $7,500). Most states offer tax credits in favor of the EV buyer, enticing them to lease payments saving the new owner some coins.

10. Reduced noise pollution

The good news is the EV offers a smooth ride that is quiet, calm and serene. The pure electric car makes the traditional car seem boring and ancient. The thought of dragging around a tank of stinking, combustible fuel and old-fashioned mechanical parts seem outdated.

The most interesting part of driving the car is it requires nothing to gear up so when you accelerate it just moves. This offers a smoother ride and you use your brakes a lot less while driving. For the music lovers, playing the music in the car is a lot clearer than driving the conventional car. It’s like listening to music in the comfort of your living room. It is more serene due to the quiet engines.

6 Disadvantages of Electric Cars

1. Range anxiety

Most of the EV drivers are constantly worried about running out of charge when miles away from the next charging system. Most electric cars are limited to a range of about 80-100 miles and need to be recharged periodically. For instance, the Ford Focus Electric and Nissan Leaf offer a range of approximately 75 miles. For most drivers, the range is enough to cover their daily activities but have the conventional gasoline car just in case, they need it.

2. Have to install chargers at home

The biggest disadvantage of the electric charging station is still in the development stages. This means there aren’t as many charging stations, which will, in turn, make you drive quite a distance in search of fuelling stations. This discourages most buyers and creates range anxiety.

3. Increased Electric bills

The other option is the EV owner may be forced to install a charging station at home, cutting into the cost savings from owning an EV in the first place. If you haven’t done your research into the electric car you want to purchase, then you may be making an unwise investment. Sometimes electric cars require a lot of energy to charge in order to function properly – which may reflect poorly on your electricity bill each month. Especially, charging during peak hours can add to your utility bills.

As electric cars need the power to charge up, cities already facing acute power shortage are not suitable for electric cars. The consumption of more power would hamper their daily power needs

4. Long charging hours

Another big concern of EV owners is the amount of time it takes to refuel an electric car. It takes only a few minutes to fuel your gasoline powered car, while it takes an electric car about 4-6 hours to fully charge using a power grid and 12 hours using the basic wall socket of 110volt.

EVs commonly can add about 20 to 25 miles of range in an hour of charging from a 240-volt source of electricity. Which means the idea of a road trip is out of the discussion, especially if it’s driving in a remote area. It would be unfortunate if you forget to charge it before you sleep.

Also, some EVs have different charging ports from the normal ports. For instance, a few of 2010 Mitsubishi-iMiEV are designed with a standard sing-phase charge port to facilitate slow charging. This simply means this model cannot use some public charge points because of its special interlock features.

5. Battery degradation

Although having an EV eliminates maintenance costs, batteries of almost all electric cars are required to be changed every 3-10 years and replacing battery packs can be costly. The battery costs roughly a few thousand and it also depends on the car model.

6. Cold season

There is also a legitimate anxiety involving cold season and the electric car. Cold weather makes lithium-ion batteries less efficient and will cause you to constantly charge the car 50% more rapidly. It’s even worse if you need to heat up the cabin of the car. It will lose more heat and reduces the normal range it covers.

However, if your EV is stored in a warm garage, the car can retain the heat, especially if you choose to preheat the cabin while it’s still plugged in the charging port.

Why The Electric Car is The Next Big Thing

Why the electric car is the next big thing
Since the introduction of electric vehicles, the automobile world has not been the same. It has been a debate between the electrical and the mechanical or chemical engineers.
Transition to electric cars is gaining momentum and people are receiving the change well. Initially, it took over two decades to sell the first million electric vehicles, but now it takes only five months to sell the same number of cars. That is a major milestone for the EVs.

According to the recent government statistics, 26% of the total gas emissions come from the transport industry. The UK government has come up with an ambitious target to adopt up to 50% of Electric cars to be able to achieve the target of ultra-low emissions by 2030 and effectively zero emissions by 2040.

So why should people welcome the EVs?

The Electric Vehicles are Eco-Friendly

It has been a major concern to everyone about the climate changes and the effects it has on our environment. The introduction of the electric cars is part of the process of improving the climate as they do not emit any harmful gases that pollute the air. Luckily the cost and health related issues caused by air pollution will decrease.

The Engineers are also adopting renewable energy systems and it’s a great idea. You are able to charge your EV using the solar panel system on the go instead of waiting until you reach the grid. This method is more economical and saves time as you get to charge it during the day where most activities take place.

Some of the EVs engineers are taking recycling to the next level by using Eco-friendly materials to build the cars. For instance, the makers of Ford Focus Electric car are using recycled materials and padding the car with bio-materials.

Nissan Leaf is also adopting the recycling idea and it is impressive. The interior and exterior are partly made of recycled bottles, second-hand appliances, old car parts and plastic bags. They are all about recycling materials and environmental conservation.

The EV Saves You Money And Simpler To Service

The conventional petrol or diesel has starter motors, fuel injection systems, exhaust systems, radiators and other moving parts for it to function properly. This means the car needs constant lubing and oil changes among other maintenance activities. The whole process is a lot costly and tedious as it is a continuous process.

On the other hand, the EV only has mechanical parts. Which means the car doesn’t need an oil tank, transmission system or a catalyst converter. Less subsystem means simpler maintenance and cost-effective.

Battery Technology

The battery technology is the major reason behind the electric vehicle concept. There are different types of electrification, the conventional hybrids, plug-in hybrids, mild hybrids and pure BEVs. The technology is leaning more on efficiency, energy density and weight of the batteries.

The most common battery type used in the EVs is Lithium-Ion and Lithium polymer battery. These batteries have a higher energy density than the weight they have. Rechargeable batteries, on the other hand, use a nickel-metal hybrid, lithium-polymer battery, lead-acid, Lithium-ion, NiCd and a less common zinc-air and molten-salt batteries.

The EV gets its power from charging through AC ports at households or different charging stations. The advantage of these methods is that almost every home has electricity and can easily power up the car. The battery charges via the installed grid but can also feed the energy back into the grid in case there is a need.

The EV drivers get to enjoy the convenience of charging at home and it is simplified by the charging EV App that enables you to initiate charging without having to walk into the garage.

Have More Powerful Motors And Are More Efficient

Depending on the battery capacity, the higher the current is produced the more powerful the motor is. The EV uses electromagnetic motors to deliver instant power to the drive train creating the torque that enables the EV to move forward. Due to the instant torque, no energy is wasted when accelerating.

Electric motors also work as electric generators, enabling the battery to recharge during braking. The rotor in motors consistently rotates when the braking system is activated. This causes the electrical field to reverse sending the electrons back to the battery. This process is known as regenerative braking.

Hence the EVs are able to recycle the energy unlike the internal combustion engine (ICE); the same energy is wasted in the form of heat from friction.

Advanced technology

More EVs are adopting more sophisticated electronics and intelligent sensors as the heart of the car. The electric cars have advanced computerized technologies and come readily installed by design. The development of the automotive industry, however, has been a lot slower than other industries.

Thankfully, the automakers are up for the challenge and some of the smart cars won’t be available for another 7-8 years due to their advanced concept.

Different control units and wiring are installed to improve the user's experience by achieving more accurate and transparent systems that control your driving environment. The car is made smart enough to detect any faults and possibly prevent accidents.

Platforms like the mirror link technology, car play, and Android auto are adopted to help the driver adjust the content of the phone and are well displayed on the dashboard. The dashboard is fitted with larger screens with bigger buttons and icons that the driver can use easily without being distracted from the road.

Imagine being able to play your favorite music playlist, while you can receive important messages, or even get notifications on low battery pop-ups and suggestions of the next charging station along your way. Impressive!

*The range is the only disadvantage the EV has compared ICE cars. However, the electric cars are fast catching up and there are models like the Tesla that are performing really well. Higher capacity batteries are developed and soon the gap will be closed.

With the target of improving our environment, Electrical vehicles are the future and the government has implemented some policies favoring the EVs. Hopefully, the emissions will drop to 44% by 2030 as proposed by the government.